Category Archives: Natural Cure of Water

The healing effectiveness of medicinal plants can be enhanced by water therapy. It can be done at home using ordinary or indigenous materials around. There are many ways you can use water to cure or treat many kinds of diseases like cold compress, sponge bath and steam inhalation.

Fever Sponge Bath

Definition:
A sponge bath given to a person with fever.

Effects:

  • Reduces fever or lowers body temperature.
  • Sedative effects.

Things Needed:

  • Basin of water—temperature as indicated.
  • Sheet or blanket to cover patient.
  • Two bath towels.
  • One face towel or washcloth.
  • Ice cubes as indicated.
  • Alcohol.

Hot Sponge Bath is given to patients with very high fever but whose skin of the legs and arms are cold. Water for hot sponge bath should be as hot as can be tolerated. The sponge bath should be done fast and with friction to encourage blood to the surface. The sponge may be repeated after 1 or 2 hours if the fever persists.

Procedure:

  • Make the patient comfortable. Remove clothing and cover with a sheet or blanket. Close windows to avoid drafts.
  • Protect the bed with the towels as each part is being sponged. Put one bath towel across the chest and sponge the face, ears, and neck. Dry the areas that had been sponged with the towel across the chest.
  • Sponge one part at a time in the following order: arms, chest, abdomen, legs, feet and back. For the arm or leg, spread the towel under the whole length of the arm or leg while it is being sponged. Rub skin briefly with the face towel to draw blood on the surface. Dry each part after the sponge to avoid chilling. Be sure the patient is dry before replacing clothing and covers. Hot drinks (kalamansi juice) may be offered to encourage perspiration.

Cold Sponge Bath is used in cases where the skin is dry and hot. Cold water is used for sponge bath but in case where skin is burning hot, ice cubes may be put in the water. Avoid chilling the patient. A cold compress on the forehead or armpits may be placed while the sponge is being done. Chilling with shivering will cause the temperature to rise. Sponge may be repeated or prolonged until the desired effects are obtained, or until the fever goes down.

Procedure:

  • Remove clothing and cover patient with sheet or blanket. Place cold compress on the forehead and armpits. Renew compress as often as you can.
  • Sponge one part at a time, in the same order as the hot sponge bath. Friction is used to bring blood to the surface and to increase the rate of circulation to hasten the cooling process. The skin may be left slightly moist, fan lightly with the towel till skin is dry. Evaporation lowers body temperature. Hot lemonade may be given.

Tepid SpongeBath is given to restless and very tense patient with fever. It has a sedative effect, relaxing the patient. Water temperature is 94-98°F, or comfortably warm if tested with the elbow. This time there should be no friction or rubbing on the skin. Sponge and dry skin very gently with very little rubbing. Prolong the treatment for relaxing effect and to allow more evaporation.

Procedure:

  • Remove clothing and cover patient with sheet or blanket. Room should be quiet and dim. No glaring lights.

Sponge one part at a time, in the same manner as the hot sponge bath. Dry patient well with very gentle rub. A gentle alcohol rub on the back may be given after the sponge. Saline Sponge Bath is given to patient who Is inactive and sleeps most of the time. Saline or salt bath has a mild tonic or stimulating effect. It makes the patient active. Water temperature should be 96-100°F or a little bit warmer than the tepid sponge. One half (1/2) cup of salt is added to a basin of water. Sponge with friction and repeat till desired effect is obtained.

Procedure:

  • Sponge in the same manner as the cold sponge bath.

Enema

Definition:
The introduction of water into the colon to stimulate bowel activity and to cleanse the bowels.

Effects:

  1. Stimulates peristalsis or bowel activities.
  2. Cleanses the colon, usually done before tests and x-rays of the colon or any of the abdominal organs.
  3. Relieves gas pain.

Things Needed:

  1. Enema can with tubing and rectal tip.
  2. Lubricant (oil or mild soap).
  3. Toilet paper.
  4. Plastic sheet or old newspaper.
  5. Salt—1 tablespoon for a liter or about 4 cups of water.
  6. Towel.
  7. Bedpan if patient is unable to go to the toilet.
  8. Bedside commode.

Procedure:

  1. Enema can be given in bed or on the padded floor if bedroom is far from the toilet bowl
  2. Give privacy to the patient if done outside of the bedroom.
  3. Place the plastic sheet or old newspaper under the patient’s buttocks.
  4. Turn the patient on the left side, with the knees flexed. Cover the patient, exposing only the rectal area.
  5. Fill up the enema can with warm water, and add 1 tablespoon of salt. Allow the solution to flow through the tubing to remove the air before inserting the rectal tip.
  6. Lubricate the rectal tip with oil or mild soap to make it easy to insert.
  7. Insert the lubricated rectal tip into the rectum allowing the water to flow slowly into the colon. The height of the can should be only about 1-1/2 feet or 18 inches (45 cm.) from the patient’s rectum.
  8. Control the rate and pressure of the solution going into the rectum by raising and towering the enema can slowly. If the patient complains of a desire to expel the fluid, stop the flow for a few seconds by pinching the tubing and let the patient open his mouth. Let him breathe through the mouth and relax.
  9. As much as possible let him hold all the solution in as long as he can before expelling the water.
  10. Remove the enema tip slowly and wrap it with tissue paper. Assist patient into the toilet or give bedpan if unable to go to the toilet bowl.
  11. Observe the return flov 12. Repeat procedure until all solution is gone or until the return flow is clear.
  12. Wash and dry patient and make him comfortable. Observe patient’s condition and reaction.
  13. Clean up the area, wash and boil the enema can, tubing and the tip before putting it away. Be sure the rubber tubing is dry before keeping it.

Precaution:
Enemas should not be given freely. Unless indicated and ordered by the physician. it will do more harm than good.

Cold Compress

Definition:
A cloth wrung from cold or ice water which may be applied to any part of the body surface.

Effects:

  1. Relieves pain due to edema or trauma.
  2. Prevents and relieves head congestion.
  3. Slows heart rate if applied over the heart.
  4. Constricts blood vessels, decreasing local blood flow.
  5. Decreases tendency to bleed due to vaso-constriction.
  6. Lowers body temperature when applied over at least one fourth of body surface, or when applied on the forehead or nape.
  7. Stops nosebleed when applied on the nasal area.

Things Needed:

  1. Washcloth or lace towel or any clean piece ot cloth. The size should be proportionate to the area to be treated. For convulsions use bath towels.
  2. A basin of ice water, 2/3 full.
  3. One bath towel.

Procedure:

  1. Wring compress cloth from ice water. Be sure it does no drip.
  2. Apply snugly on the area to be treated.
  3. Change or renew compress every 2-3 minutes.
  4. Treatment time: for decongestion—20-30 minutes; for fever, continuously, or as long as there is fever.
  5. At the end of the treatment, dry body part thoroughly with the towel and avoid chilling.